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January 31, 2018

80: David Baldwin is “a creative guy with options”

This week on “Marketing Today,” Alan talks with David Baldwin, CEO of Baldwin&, an advertising, design and strategy company in Raleigh, North Carolina. Baldwin is also the CMO of Ponysaurus Brewing Company, a film producer and, most recently, an author. His book, “The Belief Economy — How to Give a Damn, Stop Selling, and Create Buy-in,” takes a look at the seismic shift occurring in the marketing landscape and how brands can reach the next generation of influencers.

During the course of the podcast, he offers his take on Millennials and iGen, who he sees as the key players in The Belief Economy, “We better figure out what they’re about, we better figure out how they’re wired, and we better figure out how to change the way we talk to them.” He goes on to add, “If you are being true to who you are, and you’re smart about getting aligned with the people out there who love that, I think you can win.”

As to why this book and why now, he says, “I’m a capitalist, man. The point of this book is to help people sell more stuff…It’s not about not selling stuff, and it’s not about not making money. It’s about doing all of that but also having a positive effect while you’re doing it.”

He drives home his point with a question: “If you have an opportunity to make the world work a little bit better, have a positive effect around the people that use your products — why wouldn’t you do that?”

Highlights from this week’s “Marketing Today” podcast include:

  • Baldwin is many things: an author, a film producer, a brewery founder and an ad guy — but don’t call him a do-gooder. ([1:24])
  • Baldwin’s mother was a media director and he grew up around advertising: “I feel like I’ve been in advertising since I was 12.” ([5:19])
  • Baldwin discusses the impetus and thinking behind his book, “The Belief Economy.” ([6:55])
  • Three things brands need to thrive in The Belief Economy. ([12:55])
  • According to Baldwin, the popular take on Millennials is wrong — they’re not looking for a “participation trophy.” ([16:11])
  • “The reason social media was created was to connect human beings.” ([20:25])
  • Baldwin makes his case on the need for civility, particularly in America. ([26:58])

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